Member Blogs Archive > May 2016

  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    Rosie the Raven by Helga Bansch

    Mon, 23 May 2016 08:00:00 Permalink
    This is a light, fanciful story about a family of ravens.  They have one egg that is different colored and when it hatches, there's a little pink girl in it...Annick Press and Net Galley allowed me to read this book for review (thank you).  It has been published, so you can grab a copy now.Her raven parents don't care what she looks like or that she can't caw well and she can't fly.  She tries.  She even tries to grow feathers.  Her dad finds her some clothes so she won't freeze to death.  The other birds and animals have things Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    We Are Death: DCI Jericho Book Two by Douglas Lindsay

    Sun, 22 May 2016 09:00:00 Permalink
    Jericho knew there was still someone out there from his last case.  The people who paid with their lives weren't smart enough to have masterminded the tarot cards and the designs on them.  But who it is, he doesn't know.  He just waits.  And, as he waits, he watches his job slip away from him...Blasted Health and Net Galley allowed me to read this book for review (thank you).  It will be published June 15th.I enjoyed this story more than the first one.  It's an unusual plot and Jericho ends up traveling internationally but it was much like a cat Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    We Are The Hanged Man: DCI Jericho Book One by Douglas Lindsay

    Sun, 22 May 2016 08:30:00 Permalink
    DCI Jericho is practically permanently depressed.  His wife disappeared years ago now and he never could find her.  He's lost without her and feels guilty.  He also sees her and can talk to her now and then, so either she's a ghost or he's a mental case.  Or maybe both of those are true.Blasted Health and Net Galley allowed me to read this book for review (thank you).  It has been published so you can grab a copy now.Mr. Lindsay writes an interesting story.  He makes his characters with faults, no one is without sin, but they persevere on the Read More
  • from Books Tell You Why

    Arnold Lobel: The Anatomy of a Fable

    Sun, 22 May 2016 08:00:00 Permalink
    The genesis of the fable is unclear, but its legacy is far-reaching. The name "Aesop" is synonymous with fables, although the stories themselves and their corresponding lessons had been handed down for generations before he recorded them several hundred years B.C. They made their first appearance in printed English in 1484. It is safe to say, then, that fables are an integral part of our collective literary and cultural history. Their lessons are universal and timeless. Who among us has not been exhorted to heed the lesson of the Hare and the Tortoise and remember that “slow and steady wins Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    Jeff Madison and the Curse of Drakwood Forest (Book 2) by Bernice Fischer

    Sat, 21 May 2016 09:00:00 Permalink
    Jeff runs into his friend, Rhed, and Phoebe out in the woods.  He was going home until monsters he'd seen before cut him off and tried to capture him.  He tells the others to run but they aren't moving fast enough to escape.  Then a warrior shows up to defend them...Fischer Self Publishing and Net Galley allowed me to read this book for review (thank you).  It has been published and you can grab a copy now.  Pick up the first one if you haven't read it yet.  I hadn't and this book reads well as a stand alone.When the Read More
  • from Books Tell You Why

    Home On the Range: Five Writers from the American Southwest

    Sat, 21 May 2016 08:00:00 Permalink
    Deserts. The Mojave. The Sonoran. The Chihuahuan. Vast, barren, dusty landscapes with skies that seem to stretch forever, and towering, jagged rock formations cut from the scorched earth. Cacti. Heat. Sun. In other words, tough country, both in terms of its topography and culture and politics. Conflict between American settlers and Native American Indians looms large in the history of this place, as does the often tortured relationship its inhabitants experience between calling this region home and striving to get out. But as we’ve seen time and time again with this series, great conflict often breeds great beauty, and writers Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    Who Broke the Teapot?! by Bill Slavin

    Sat, 21 May 2016 08:00:00 Permalink
    The kitchen is a mess.  The family is up, eating breakfast, and spilling their food.  But what really sets Mom off is the fact that her favorite teapot has fallen off the shelf and broken!Tundra Books and Net Galley let me read this book for review (thank you).  It has been published, so you can grab a copy now.The two page spreads of Mom being angry and shouting are great illustrations.  You can SEE her shout and yell about the teapot.  When she questions them, they all deny touching it.  They did lots of other bad things but not that.  Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    Neal Cassady's long-lost letter to Jack Kerouac at auction

    Sat, 21 May 2016 07:00:15 Permalink
    Source: Neal Cassady’s long-lost letter to Jack Kerouac at auction Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    Review of 'Reimagining the Gothic', 6th-7th May 2016 | Open Graves, Open Minds

    Sat, 21 May 2016 06:11:59 Permalink
    ‘Reimagining the Gothic 2016: Monsters and Monstrosities’ took place on 6th-7th May. It consisted of two days: the first being a showcase which featured both postgraduates and undergraduates workin… Source: Review of ‘Reimagining the Gothic’, 6th-7th May 2016 | Open Graves, Open Minds Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    BBC – Culture – Feral: The children raised by wolves

    Sat, 21 May 2016 05:54:34 Permalink
    cared for by Elizabeth Clayton Source: BBC – Culture – Feral: The children raised by wolves Beautiful and disturbing at the same time, the images in Julia Fullerton-Batten’s latest project have a dreamlike, fairy-tale quality. Yet the lives they portray are real. “There are two different scenarios – one where the child ended up in […] Read More
  • from ten pound island book company

    Requirements for Working on the Great American Novel

    Sat, 21 May 2016 01:40:27 Permalink
    Only in Ireland It helps to leave America, in my case anyway. Not for any political or philosophical reasons, but because there are fewer distractions in a country where hardly anyone knows you. We hung out with our friends Mick and Kathy for a few days. They run a retreat center called Sherkin North Shore […]The post Requirements for Working on the Great American Novel appeared first on Ten Pound Island Book Company. Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    Julia Vanishes by Catherine Egan

    Fri, 20 May 2016 09:00:00 Permalink
    Julia has a special ability to make herself invisible.  That's real handy when you're a thief.  It also works out well when she acts as a servant to spy on a household.  She doesn't want to get caught snooping...Random House Children's Knopf's Book for Young Readers and Net Galley allowed me to read this book for review (thank you).  It will be published June 7th.This is a dark fantasy novel about a girl and her brother and her boyfriend who all live with an older lady who provides room and board.  At the moment, they are living by theft.  They Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    The Sleeping Prince: A Sin Eater's Daughter Novel by Melinda Salisbury

    Fri, 20 May 2016 08:30:00 Permalink
    Errin is just trying to stay alive.  Since her father died and her mother has turned into something like a beast, she tries to sell her herbal remedies to get enough for food.  The cabin they live in is mostly in  squalor.  She can't care for her mother, take care of the house and keep food in their mouths all at the same time.  It's a godsend when her new friend can buy some herbal remedies from her and pays her well.  But he brings trouble...Scholastic Press and Edelweiss gave me the opportunity to read this book for review (thank Read More
  • from Books Tell You Why

    Collecting Books with Woodcuts

    Fri, 20 May 2016 08:00:00 Permalink
    Since the eighth century in Japan, woodcuts have been used for printing textiles and paper, and later for creating illustrations in books. According to an article* from the Metropolitan Museum of Art's website, “woodcuts are produced by inking a raised surface against which a piece of paper is pressed, either manually or by running it through a press, to create an image on the paper.” Beginning in the fifteenth century, woodcuts served as illustrations in printed books, and many scholars attribute the first successful black-and-white woodcuts as book illustrations to Albrecht Dürer. By the mid-sixteenth century, woodcuts were replaced largely Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    Charles Brockden Brown, "Somnambulism" | Library of America

    Fri, 20 May 2016 07:09:59 Permalink
    Source: Charles Brockden Brown, “Somnambulism” | Library of America Read More
  • from Pistil Blog

    IOBA Scholarship for Book Collectors

    Fri, 20 May 2016 02:56:00 Permalink
    The Independent Online Booksellers Association is offering a $750 scholarship for book collectors to go to a book seminar.  Details can be found here.  You do not need to be a bookseller or be a member of any organization to apply.I have attended CABS and Rare Book School and recommend both. Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    The Mage of Trelian by Michelle Knudsen

    Thu, 19 May 2016 09:00:00 Permalink
    Calen had no choice; he had to leave with the mage.  He hoped the others understood that but he knew they didn't.  They thought he had betrayed them.  He had to get back so he could show them he hadn't...Candlewick Press and Net Galley allowed me to read this book for review (thank you).  It has been published and is available now.The problem Calen has is that while he wants to get away from the mage who is controlling, he's also learning about magic and how much power he has.  He wants to learn more but he'd like to get Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    Hand Over Fist by Michael Ross

    Thu, 19 May 2016 03:00:00 Permalink
    Martin's life has gone to hell.  His work fell apart around him, he found out his wife wasn't faithful and she took everything from him in the divorce.  The only good thing he has left in his life is his son and he has to be careful about how he handles that or she might not permit visitations.  Life sucks.The author and Goddess Fish Blog Tours sent me a copy of this book to read for review (thank you).   You can buy a copy now on Amazon.At first, it's a bit confusing because you have two characters living their own Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    The Ninja Librarians: Sword in the Stacks by Jen Swann Downey

    Wed, 18 May 2016 09:00:00 Permalink
    Dorrie wants nothing more than to be an apprentice librarian.  She's almost afraid they won't ask her back but she's in luck, they do.  But things have changed.  She had a teacher lined up but she gets assigned another...Sourcebooks Jabberwocky and Net Galley allowed me to read this book for review (thank you). It will be published June 7th.This story has fascinating young and old characters, time travel, enemies all through time, and danger abounds.  The travel is through libraries by using a person who can move through time and take others with them.  The library is in danger because Read More
  • from Books Tell You Why

    The Bond Dossier: Live and Let Die

    Wed, 18 May 2016 08:00:00 Permalink
    The saying goes that an artist has his or her entire life to create their first major work, but only a few years to finish their second. It’s an adage often used to rationalize a drop-off in quality or ambition between an artist’s first two major pieces, which is an all too common occurrence. But Ian Fleming is perhaps the shining exception to this rule. Fleming’s second James Bond novel, Live and Let Die, was published April 5, 1954 and was completed just a few months before the release of the debut Bond novel, Casino Royale—in fact, some Bond scholars Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    Constance Fenimore Woolson's Female Gothic Rebel: An Interpretation of Jupiter Lights | The Gothic Wanderer

    Wed, 18 May 2016 07:08:12 Permalink
    Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840-1894) is generally regarded as an author of realism, but she was influenced by her famous great-uncle, James Fenimore Cooper, to create Gothic forest and island sce… Source: Constance Fenimore Woolson’s Female Gothic Rebel: AnInterpretation of Jupiter Lights | The Gothic Wanderer Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    Why I believe in the story of 'Old Stinker' the Hull Werewolf | Open Graves, Open Minds

    Wed, 18 May 2016 01:17:49 Permalink
    Sabine Baring-Gould claims that ‘English folklore is singularly barren of werewolf stories , the reason being that wolves had been extirpated from England under the Anglo Saxon kings, and therefore ceased to be the object of dread to the people’ (Book of Werewolves, 1867, p. 77). Source: Why I believe in the story of ‘Old […] Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    Celluloid Wicker Man | Reviews, Essays and Analysis of Film and Art By Adam Scovell

    Tue, 17 May 2016 10:41:06 Permalink
    Reviews, Essays and Analysis of Film and Art By Adam Scovell Source: Celluloid Wicker Man | Reviews, Essays and Analysis of Film and Art By Adam Scovell Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    How to (Almost) Ruin Your Summer by Taryn Souders

    Tue, 17 May 2016 09:00:00 Permalink
    Her parents are taking a trip and she's looking forward to staying home with her girlfriends.  However, they have plans for her.  They're going to send her to camp!Sourcebooks Jabberwocky and Net Galley allowed me to read this book for review (thank you).  It will be published June 7th.Camp isn't on her list of fun things to do, but she has no choice.  She ends up with the diva of the group of girls in their cabin.  It's a good thing Chloe met a girl she could get along with as she joined the new arrivals.  The other girl was Read More
  • from Books Tell You Why

    John Patrick: Workaholic of the Stage and Screen

    Tue, 17 May 2016 08:00:00 Permalink
    One evening, John Patrick revved his chainsaw on the president of a power company’s lawn. The playwright wanted to run an extra power line to his new farm in New York state. Having received nothing but a string of empty promises, Patrick decided to take matters into his own hands. So he threatened to cut down the executive’s elm tree unless his concerns were properly addressed. The playwright knew a little about getting what he wanted—he had a Pulitzer Prize, after all. Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    Overdrafts of Pleasure

    Tue, 17 May 2016 02:30:35 Permalink
    John Cleland wrote his (very) erotic novel, Fanny Hill, in prison. What did he mean by it?Max Nelson is writing a series on prison literature. Read the previous entry, on Merle Haggard and the long tradition of the outlaw poet, here.John Cleland’s sentences often resemble the sexual encounters he imagined in his best-known book—a two-volume novel called Memoirs of… […] Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    Korean Lesbian Revenge Thriller Takes Cannes — Vulture

    Mon, 16 May 2016 11:21:55 Permalink
    It’s from Oldboy director Park Chan-Wook, and, yes, as is his trademark, somebody loses a body part. Source: Korean Lesbian Revenge Thriller Takes Cannes — Vulture Read More
  • from Gothica Books

    Mock graveyard could be built in Whitby to prevent goths 'disrespecting the dead' at Dracula cemetery 

    Mon, 16 May 2016 10:30:23 Permalink
    Source: Mock graveyard could be built in Whitby to prevent goths ‘disrespecting the dead’ at Dracula cemetery  Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    Last Call at the Nightshade Lounge by Paul Krueger

    Mon, 16 May 2016 09:00:00 Permalink
    She's working at the local bar to make some money of her own and to see her old flame again.  She walked away from him in the past but it's four years later and he's looking good.  The only problem is that he already has a girlfriend...Quirk Books and Edelweiss allowed me to read this book for review (thank you).  It will be published June 7th.This is an odd little story.  It seems the bartenders have a second job, a night job.  When they aren't working at the bar, they kill demons.  They've been trained, they are good at their Read More
  • from Journey of a Bookseller

    The Secret of Dreadwillow Carse by Brian Farrey

    Mon, 16 May 2016 08:30:00 Permalink
    The queen is dying.  The princess is only twelve and she has no desire to be queen, but she also has no choice.  When the queen brings her a tutor he's an odd little man who answers her questions with more questions.  She has no idea what she's learning or how much until she gets in a crisis.Algonquin Young Readers and Net Galley allowed me to read this book for review (thank you).  It has been published, so you can buy a copy now.When Jeniah surveys her kingdom with her mother, she sees a dark spot from the tower.  She's Read More
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