Member Blogs > Books Tell You Why

  • Happy Birthday, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle!

    Wed, 22 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Today is the birthday of Scottish author and doctor Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. His character Sherlock Holmes has inspired generations of crime fiction writers. Collectors who are interested in mystery and crime fiction on the whole, as well as those focused on specific authors within the genre, would do well to pay  Arthur Conan Doyle some attention. He has had a wide-reaching impact, and his books fit well in to a myriad of different collecting categories.  Read More
  • Edith Wharton, Sinclair Lewis, and a Pulitzer Kerfuffle

    Tue, 21 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Edith Wharton's accomplishments included not only authorship, but also design and philanthropy. Wharton was an active participant in literary circles, befriending personages like Henry James and Jean Cocteau. She would go on to forge relationships with Theodore Roosevelt and other important figures. Yet the most fascinating of Wharton's connections is possibly the one with Sinclair Lewis. Read More
  • Caldecott Winning Illustrators Series: Katherine Milhous

    Fri, 17 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    For American illustrators, one of the highest honors is The Caldecott Medal. The medal is awarded yearly to a book that exemplifies the very best in children's book illustrations. To even be named a Caldecott Honor book is to be deemed one of the best artists in the business. Children's books are one of the rare types of literature that appeal to everyone at one point in their life or another (and, in many cases, for one's entire life!). Whether a person comes to a children's book as a child or as an adult reading to a child, the stories Read More
  • Why Pierce Brosnan Would be Borges' Favorite Bond

    Thu, 16 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Argentine literary giant Jorge Luis Borges died in 1986 at the age of 86 having left a behind a legacy that any writer would envy. His being snubbed for the Nobel Prize in Literature is, in its way, more memorable than the victories of other writers (how many of us remember Jaroslav Seifert’s 1984 win?), and even at the time of his death, it was pretty clear that his short stories had a much better shot at literary immortality than most of his contemporaries’ work. Still, his death came several years before the release of 1995’s Goldeneye, which means that Read More
  • The Wonderful Adaptations of Oz

    Wed, 15 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    With advancing technology, it is becoming less and less rare for an adaptation to be better known than an original work, especially if the original work is a book. First published in 1900, L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and its 13 sequels, has long been a favorite of readers. The world of Oz Baum created grabs hold of the imagination. As a result, it has led many writers to add their own interpretation and work to the magical land of Oz. In addition to the written works, Baum’s world has become a cultural icon due, in part, to the Read More
  • Top Books By State: Arkansas

    Mon, 13 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Today, we are continuing our bookish road trip through the United States by taking a look at Arkansas. The books we've chosen to highlight for our examination of this southern state were picked either for the author's Arkansas connection or because they're set in Arkansas. Arkansas is split between the Ozarks and the Gulf Coastal plain and is known for it's unique and varied landscapes as well as being home to some notable political leaders. Let's take a look at four books that make up some of the literature of Arkansas. Read More
  • Charles van Sandwyk: Captivating Books of Exceptional Artistry

    Sun, 12 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    The work of Charles van Sandwyk is a delight for all book lovers, but especially enthusiasts of fine press, children's literature, and exceptional illustrations. Recalling an earlier age, his artwork portrays whimsical animals, fairies, and elves in unique, and sometimes magical settings. As a child, van Sandwyk immersed himself in the works of J. M. Barrie, Beatrix Potter, and J. R. R. Tolkien. These influences are evident in his own creations, as is his admiration for classic illustrator Arthur Rackham. Take a moment to delve into the world of Charles van Sandwyk. Be enchanted. Read More
  • Harry S. Truman: 33rd President of the United States

    Wed, 08 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    President Harry S. Truman was not always a popular president. Rather like Donald Trump in the Trump/Clinton Election of 2016, when Truman ran for reelection, most predicted a loss for him. The mainstream media had written him off, and polls inaccurately portrayed his chances. He shocked the country when he managed to pull off the victory on election day. His work as both a war time and peace time president sets him apart from many leaders who can only accomplish one leadership style.  Read More
  • Choosing the Perfect Gift for Mother's Day

    Tue, 07 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    In the United States, Mother's Day is just around the corner: the second Sunday in May. Shopping for mom can be tough! She may say she doesn't want anything in particular, or she may ask for utilitarian gifts that aren't items she'll really enjoy. But you definitely want to give a Mother's Day gift that is both meaningful and thoughtful. We've come up with a few strategies for selecting the perfect gift. Hopefully, this post will make your Mother's Day gift-giving process easier. Read More
  • Four Writers To Explore on Cinco de Mayo

    Sun, 05 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    While often confused in America for Mexican Independence Day, Cinco de Mayo is actually the anniversary of the Battle of Puebla and Mexico's victory against the French. As the name implies, it is celebrated annually on May 5th. In Mexico, it is not observed as a national holiday, though schools are closed on that day and it's often celebrated with parades and historical enactments. The holiday is actually celebrated more outside of Mexico than it is in the country itself. In the United States in particular, Cinco de Mayo has taken on a life of its own and has become Read More
  • Ten Things You Didn't Know about Breakfast at Tiffany's

    Sat, 04 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Truman Capote is a legendary American author who penned such classics as In Cold Blood and Other Voices, Other Rooms. But Breakfast at Tiffany's is undoubtedly Capote's most beloved work. Adapted into both a movie and a musical, the story has enraptured generation after generation. The novella remains a favorite among rare book collectors. Here are a few tidbits you probably didn't know about this iconic story. Read More
  • A History of the Bastard Title

    Fri, 03 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    At last, it is time to read your new book. It is a crisp evening and you have made a cup of your favorite tea. You splurged and even made a fire. You sink into your chair and look at the book’s cover, tracing the title with your fingertip. You sip your tea and open to the first page. Blank. You turn the page. Nearly blank, except for the title—again. With some impatience, you turn to the next page.  Here the title is presented a third time but with the welcome addition of the author and publisher. Your tea nearly Read More
  • The History of May Day and May Day in Literature

    Wed, 01 May 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    For many bibliophiles, the month of May means the beginning of summer—longer days, warmer weather, and the unofficial start of “beach read” season. But May 1 packs a much more significant historical and cultural punch, the essence of which many authors have tried to capture in their stories and novels during the last 100 years. Read More
  • Kicking Off Tombstones: Henry James' Life and Work

    Mon, 29 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Henry James was born in New York City on April 15, 1843. He had three brothers and one sister, and his parents were rich, thanks to their inheritances. Though he held no official job of his own, Henry James’ father, Henry Sr., used his wealth to move his family abroad when Henry was just twelve years old. His motivation was to ensure his children had the best academic opportunities provided for them. The result was a four year tour of Europe where the family sought out the best schools and tutors for the James children. Henry Jr. ended up as Read More
  • Choosing the Perfect Gift for Mother's Day

    Fri, 26 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    In the United States, Mother's Day is just around the corner: the second Sunday in May. Shopping for mom can be tough! She may say she doesn't want anything in particular, or she may ask for utilitarian gifts that aren't items she'll really enjoy. But you definitely want to give a Mother's Day gift that is both meaningful and thoughtful. We've come up with a few strategies for selecting the perfect gift. Hopefully, this post will make your Mother's Day gift-giving process easier. Read More
  • Ten of Walter de la Mare's Poetic Quotes

    Thu, 25 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Throughout his career as a writer, Walter de la Mare created many works for audiences of all ages, from poetry to prose to literary criticism to anthologies. He collaborated with other authors, including Rudyard Kipling to produce St. Andrews, Two Poems. Much of de la Mare’s work focused on themes of dreams, death, and emotion with an emphasis on creating a feeling of transcendent reality through a dreamlike tone, showing the importance de la Mare places on imagination. Read More
  • Book Spotlight: Tales From Shakespeare by Tina Packer

    Tue, 23 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Seventeenth century poet and playwright William Shakespeare penned some of the most well-known stories in the world. The conflict, romance, comedy, and wordplay have captivated audiences for over four hundred years, and Shakespeare's plays continue to be performed on stage and screen in both their original form and in new, adapted forms. The varying forms shed a different light on the stories, introducing them and making them more accessible to a new audience. Read More
  • Top Books By State: Arizona

    Fri, 19 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Arizona: the land of scorching desserts and swimming pools in every backyard. Of hot, dry temperatures and the deep, majestic Grand Canyon. But what about the literary output from or about Arizona? Which authors have made this southwestern state their home, and what sorts of works have they crafted with Arizona as their setting? Continuing our series of the top books in each state, today, we focus on Arizona. We have actually pulled two books by one, well-known Arizonian author and one book by another. These titles impress us with the vivid imagery of the setting alongside the griping stories Read More
  • The Kupfer Bibel and an Epic Struggle for the Danish Crown

    Thu, 18 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Rare book sellers and collectors often talk about the provenance of a book, that is, it's chain of ownership. Knowing a book's provenance offers practical benefits, such as ensuring that a book isn't stolen and lending credibility to a volume's inscription. But exploring a book's provenance also has another benefit: it can unlock fascinating stories connected with the book itself, enriching our understanding of—and appreciation for—the book as an object with its own special history. One example of a book with fascinating provenance is our edition of the Kupfer-Bibel. Read More
  • Caldecott Winning Illustrators Series: Leo Politi

    Tue, 16 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Each year the Caldecott Medal is awarded to a book that represents the best of children's illustration. The illustrious list of winning books contains a massive variety, from the style of the illustrations to the subjects of the books, to the backgrounds of the illustrators who poured themselves into the creation of these amazing pieces of art. The latest illustrator to be featured in our Caldecott Winning Illustrators Series is Leo Politi. Politi won the award in 1950 for his book Song of the Swallows. Read More
  • The History and Importance of the Pulitzer Prize

    Mon, 15 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    The Pulitzer Prize—set to be awarded today—was established over 100 years ago to honor exceptional achievements in journalism. Since its inception, the award has grown to include 21 different categories, ranging from literature to musical composition. The prize is named for Joseph Pulitzer, a newspaper journalist with a fascinating life.  Read More
  • An Introduction to Legendary Chess Player Garry Kasparov

    Sat, 13 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Garry Kasparov was born in 1963 in Baku, Azerbaijan in the Soviet Union. At the age of 12 he became the USSR’s under-18 chess champion and at 17, he was the world under-20 champion. In 1985 at the age of 22, he achieved fame for being the youngest world chess champion. Throughout his chess career, he defended his title five times, broke Bobby Fisher’s rating record, and—perhaps most famously—played against the IBM super-computer Deep Blue. Outside of his work as a professional chess player, Kasparov was vocal about his support for democratic and market reforms and the dissolution of the Read More
  • Climbing Into Jon Krakauer, Legendary Mountaineering Author

    Fri, 12 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    American writer and outdoorsman Jon Krakauer was born April 12, 1954. He was raised in Corvallis, Oregon and was first acquainted with mountain climbing when he was eight years old. He attended Hampshire College in Massachusetts where he graduated in 1976 with a degree in Environmental Studies. Following his time at university, Krakauer moved around the States, living in Colorado, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. He worked as a commercial fisherman and a carpenter to support himself while he pursued his love for nature and rock climbing. Read More
  • The Fascinating Inspiration Behind Favorite Horror Novels

    Thu, 11 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Today is Thomas Harris' birthday. The legendary horror author is best known for the stories he spun surrounding serial-killer, Hannibal Lecter. Have you ever wondered what Harris' inspiration was for crafting one of the most notorious villains in all of literature? Is Lecter purely a figment of Harris' imagination? Or was there a real-life muse for the killer? Perhaps you find both options unsettling! But if you've ever been curious about the inspiration behind some of your favorite horror novels, read on.    Read More
  • Do You Know Where Your Signed Books Come From?

    Tue, 09 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    When one thinks of fraud, the first cases that come to mind may be corrupt money managers (à la Bernard Madoff) or bankers. Businesses like Enron and WorldCom may likewise ring a bell, as well. Why are we talking about fraud on a blog about books, though? Well, sadly the book buying and selling business has not escaped instances of fraud, either. In 2012, Allan Formhals was found guilty of ten counts of fraud. But he wasn't an unscrupulous banker, he was an antiques dealer who sold books on the internet. Formhals was convicted of forging signatures in books and purveying them Read More
  • Five of Trina Schart Hyman's Masterful Works

    Mon, 08 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Born in 1939, Trina Schart Hyman spent her childhood in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. As a young adult, she studied at the Philadelphia Museum College of Art, the Boston Museum School of Art, and the Swedish State Art School in Stockholm, Konstfackskolan. She published her first work in 1961. From 1972 to 1979, Hyman started working as an artist and illustrator for Cricket magazine for children, eventually becoming the art director. Throughout her career, Hyman won the Caldecott Medal once and Caldecott honors three times. She illustrated more than 150 books. Read More
  • Movie Tie-Ins: Sturges' and Tracy's Old Man and the Sea

    Fri, 05 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Ernest Hemingway (1889-1961) is universally considered one of the most important writers of the 20th century and certainly one of the most influential writers of the American literary canon. Hemingway's career stretched over three decades of war. He wrote travel journalism, seven novels, numerous novellas, short story collections, and works of nonfiction. His novels For Whom the Bell Tolls, A Farewell to Arms, and The Sun Also Rises are considered to be some of the most important works of literature written in the English language. Hemingway's style has served as an influence to generations of writers and has helped form the Read More
  • Five Interesting Facts About Maya Angelou

    Thu, 04 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    Born in April 4, 1928 as Marguerite Johnson in St. Louis, Maya Angelou had a difficult childhood. Her parents divorced when she was three, leaving Angelou to be raised by her grandmother. When she was seven, Angelou was sexually assaulted by her mother’s boyfriend. After testifying against him, her attacker was beaten to death in an alley, causing Angelou to believe her voice was too powerful. She decided to remain nearly mute for the next five years. During this time Angelou connected with the written word, paving the way for her future as a writer. Read More
  • Washington Irving: Champion of American Literature at Home and Abroad

    Tue, 02 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    When "The Legend of Sleep Hollow" was published in 1820, the United States of America was a young nation. American-born authors were decades away from producing central classics like Leaves of Grass and Moby-Dick, and the cultural direction of this brave new world was anyone’s guess. The country was in need of a strong and talented writer to steer her on the right course. This author was Washington Irving. Read More
  • Netflix Announces New Tolkien Adaptation Slated for 2021

    Mon, 01 Apr 2019 08:00:00 Permalink
    For years now, film and television producers have been battling each other to create the one piece of fantasy media that will dominate all others. There was New Line’s Lord of the Rings (2001-2003) adaptions, HBO’s Game of Thrones (2011-2019) series, New Line’s subsequent Hobbit (2012-2014) trilogy, and now, as of a blockbuster 2017 deal, Amazon Studios will be producing at least five seasons worth of television based on Tolkien’s iconic mythos and characters—a show that they, like those that have gone before them, hope will be the one series to rule them all. In this regard, it sometimes feels like these Read More
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