Member Blogs > Words In The Wind

  • I Could Pee on This

    Sat, 20 Jul 2013 11:44:32 Permalink
    Dont shout at me: its the title of a book! More specifically, I Could Pee on This and Other Poems by Cats, by Franceso Marciuliano. Make a note: you may want to give copies to cat-loving friends as gifts!  While its not great literature, this little book is full of charm, from Marciulianos humor to some great cat photos to the poems themselves. Of the poems the author says in his introduction, by the time you ve finished reading this poetry anthology, youll not only completely understand everything your cat thinks and does but even applaud him for it. Maybe give Read More
  • Collecting Interests Change With the Times

    Sat, 20 Jul 2013 11:43:44 Permalink
    Recently I have had several discussions with various antiques, ephemera, and book dealers about changes in collecting interests. Antiques dealers cite the loss of interest in Victoriana, carnival glass, pressed glass, china, and many of the 1970s-80s collectibles that were issued for collectors. Booksellers note flagging interest in Western Americana, reference books that have been digitized online, and a slump in the collectible childrens books market. The last generations nostalgia moves along with the generations. Its a constant trend, and a sharp seller will not only note what is coming on, but will try to see what will be sought Read More
  • Sat, 20 Jul 2013 11:42:15 Permalink
    About the Birds: Poetry Month and Earth Day Since I seem to be derelict (or busy) regarding this blog, and considering that April is National Poetry Month here in the USA, perhaps it is time to share a few of my poems. And since it is also Earth Day, poems about wild birds seems appropriate.  Please note that these poems are all copyright in my name.  My young neighbor, years ago, was passionate about raptors and had permissions from National authorities to hold and treat wild species. At any given time you might find Golden Eagles, Bald Eagles, Red-tailed Hawks, and other Read More
  • Scrapbooks: Intimate Records of Everyday Life, and More

    Sat, 20 Jul 2013 11:40:56 Permalink
    When I was in school (long, long ago) we were sometimes assigned a scrapbook project. I can remember doing one on Venezuela that included an essay on Simon Bolivar, agriculture, industry, history, maps, etc. with any illustrations I could find. (Wretched old textbooks and National Geographics from the thrift shops often helped with such projects.) Another was on Abraham Lincoln (I can still feel the coarseness of the construction paper brown that comprised the pages of that album. It was old paper, and had a distinctive dusty odor, too.) Many young friends kept scrapbooks of movie stars, horses, Read More
  • Writing With Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance, by Ellen Gruber Garvey

    Sat, 20 Jul 2013 11:38:33 Permalink
    In my previous blog I mentioned a brief history of scrapbooks, and several books on the subject. Writing With Scissors is probably the most scholarly of these, focusing as it does on some of the most historically significant albums and collections.  Hooked on the subject by the discovery of a farm womans scrapbook of clipped articles dedicated to the environment of the home that she discovered in a used book store, Garvey went on to explore the world of scrapbooks housed in libraries, archives, and historical societies. Scrapbooks are often extremely personal, miniature archives of daily life not meant for public Read More
  • Scrapbooks: Intimate Records of Everyday Life, and More

    Sat, 29 Jun 2013 02:46:20 Permalink
    When I was in school (long, long ago) we were sometimes assigned a scrapbook project. I can remember doing one on Venezuela that included an essay on Simon Bolivar, agriculture, industry, history, maps, etc. with any illustrations I could find. (Wretched old textbooks and National Geographics from the thrift shops often helped with such projects.) Another was on Abraham Lincoln (I can still feel the coarseness of the construction paper brown that comprised the pages of that album. It was old paper, and had a distinctive dusty odor, too.) Many young friends kept scrapbooks of movie stars, horses, Read More
  • Sun, 21 Apr 2013 07:43:31 Permalink
    About the Birds: Poetry Month and Earth Day Since I seem to be derelict (or busy) regarding this blog, and considering that April is National Poetry Month here in the USA, perhaps it is time to share a few of my poems. And since it is also Earth Day, poems about wild birds seems appropriate.  Please note that these poems are all copyright in my name.  My young neighbor, years ago, was passionate about raptors and had permissions from National authorities to hold and treat wild species. At any given time you might find Golden Eagles, Bald Eagles, Red-tailed Hawks, and other Read More
  • Sun, 21 Apr 2013 04:12:25 Permalink
    About the Birds: Poetry Month and Earth Day Since I seem to be derelict (or busy) regarding this blog, and considering that April is National Poetry Month here in the USA, perhaps it is time to share a few of my poems. And since it is also Earth Day, poems about wild birds seems appropriate.  Please note that these poems are all copyright in my name.  My young neighbor, years ago, was passionate about raptors and had permissions from National authorities to hold and treat wild species. At any given time you might find Golden Eagles, Bald Eagles, Red-tailed Hawks, and other Read More
  • I Could Pee on This

    Sat, 20 Oct 2012 08:01:24 Permalink
    Dont shout at me: its the title of a book! More specifically, I Could Pee on This and Other Poems by Cats, by Franceso Marciuliano. Make a note: you may want to give copies to cat-loving friends as gifts!  While its not great literature, this little book is full of charm, from Marciulianos humor to some great cat photos to the poems themselves. Of the poems the author says in his introduction, by the time you ve finished reading this poetry anthology, youll not only completely understand everything your cat thinks and does but even applaud him for it. Maybe give Read More
  • I Could Pee on This

    Sat, 20 Oct 2012 07:59:02 Permalink
    Dont shout at me: its the title of a book! More specifically, I Could Pee on This and Other Poems by Cats, by Franceso Marciuliano. Make a note: you may want to give copies to cat-loving friends as gifts!  While its not great literature, this little book is full of charm, from Marciulianos humor to some great cat photos to the poems themselves. Of the poems the author says in his introduction, by the time you ve finished reading this poetry anthology, youll not only completely understand everything your cat thinks and does but even applaud him for it. Maybe give Read More
  • Collecting Interests Change With the Times

    Mon, 08 Oct 2012 04:53:32 Permalink
    Recently I have had several discussions with various antiques, ephemera, and book dealers about changes in collecting interests. Antiques dealers cite the loss of interest in Victoriana, carnival glass, pressed glass, china, and many of the 1970s-80s collectibles that were issued for collectors. Booksellers note flagging interest in Western Americana, reference books that have been digitized online, and a slump in the collectible childrens books market. The last generations nostalgia moves along with the generations. Its a constant trend, and a sharp seller will not only note what is coming on, but will try to see what will be sought Read More
  • How Many Fish in the Ocean?

    Sun, 09 Sep 2012 07:53:54 Permalink
    40 years ago I was deeply involved in environmental action programs. In fact, my then-spouse was a student at the University or Oregon in the Honors program, part of which included an optional program called Search. Each student in Search prepared his or her own topic and, with the supervision of a faculty advisor, outlined a curriculum or project to satisfy academic requirements.So was born a class titled Can Man Survive? Since the catalog for the term had already been issued, my husband (Zed) and his advisor (John) and I sat around our dining room table and made paper signs Read More
  • More on The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency

    Fri, 10 Aug 2012 04:03:23 Permalink
    I have just finished reading another of Alexander McCall Smiths charming novels about Mma Ramotswe and her detective agency, the one and only in Gaborone, Botswana. I keep wondering why I continue to feel refreshed after reading one of them. The stories are sweet and compelling, although not riveting. The characters have grown through the course of the novels, each with his or her quirks and motivations, until I feel as though I know them fairly well. (Actually, McCall does little in the way of description a few character tags, and you fill in the rest for yourself.) Precious Read More
  • Did I Love It? Did I Hate it? I haven't decided….

    Tue, 03 Jul 2012 08:57:24 Permalink
    John Lanchesters The Debt to Pleasure sports a subtle cover, a picture of peaches and grapes on a while tablecloth, with a very small script A Novel located at the base of a peach. In other words, if you dont pay attention, you might miss the fact that its fiction. While you would no doubt realize that its fiction before reading too far, the beginning is deceptive enough that you might feel that you are reading a food commentary akin to the writings of Brillat-Savarin, potentially because the author compares his book to that gourmand reporter. There is a lot Read More
  • Another Wonderful Book Fair

    Fri, 25 May 2012 02:09:16 Permalink
    Once again, I rushed to prepare for the Rose City Book Fair in Portland (OR) May 18-19. I didnt mean to rush I had planned to have plenty of time. But then we had unexpected visitors, more visitors, and some more visitors. Which was lovely, since some were family and some were colleagues who bought some inventory. None-the-less, the preparation time evaporated. Fortunately, I have a lot of inventory permanently set up and ready to go postcards, photos, maps, and ephemera. Although I had planned to sort, repackage, and index the ephemera before the show, that just didnt Read More
  • On preventing mold in Berries

    Sat, 05 May 2012 12:44:07 Permalink
    This tip is circulating around the Internet. It often includes a nice photo, but since they seem to be copyright protected so I won't post them. But having had particularly bad luck with keeping berries this year so far, I wanted to pass this along (slightly modified from the original):Berries are delicate. Raspberries in particular seem to mold before you get them home from the market. There's nothing more tragic than paying $4 for a pint of local raspberries, only to look in the fridge the next day and find fuzzy mold growing on their insides. Wash them with vinegar Read More
  • A Little Bit About Altered Books

    Sat, 21 Apr 2012 01:30:14 Permalink
    Now and then I am confronted by someone who does not understand how I can participate in activity that involves destroying books. But yes I do, and without qualms.Georgia O'Keefe homage, for "Divine Women" altered bookI explain to them that hundreds of thousands of unwanted books are shredded or sent to the landfill every year. Its hard to swallow, if you love books, but not every printed volume is precious. Book alterers try to repurpose these unwanted books into works of art. Others use old books to create shelves, accessories such as handbags, even furniture. "Henge" foldout for Spiritual Read More
  • The Rocking-Horse in Literature: a Genre of Faint Accomplishments

    Sun, 08 Apr 2012 01:05:46 Permalink
     With an interest in literature and the history of the book, I recently browsed one of The Book Buyer magazines that I purchase from a colleague. This magazine offered reviews of American and Foreign literature, author and illustrator profiles, reviews of new books, and even articles on such subjects as book plates. One letter to the editor speaking to the issue of limp and thoughtless writing (and in particular of a new book of poetry by Charles Swinburne) is so pointed and amusing, and so deliciously phrased, that I gave up trying to edit it down and include it here Read More
  • The 20,000,000 year old Mystery Skull of Oregon

    Thu, 09 Feb 2012 02:10:31 Permalink
    The 20,000,000 year old Mystery Skull of OregonThe old historical museumI remember visiting the Old Oregon Historical Museum at Gold Hill when I was a child. It was part of a group of roadside attractions that included the Oregon Vortex, Trees of Mystery, the Prehistoric Gardens (life-sized replicas of prehistoric animals), and if I recall correctly there was an Indian Village  and a petting zoo, and whatever other enterprise that could thrown up near the Vortex, which was and still is a major attraction. Studies suggest that there might be something weird at the site of the vortex Read More
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