Member Blogs > ten pound island book company

  • Imaginary Toads, Real Gardens

    Mon, 08 Apr 2013 10:46:08 Permalink
    (Please take a moment to read Marianne Moore's wonderful poem from which this week's title is stolen.)It'll never fit!Impossible to go about packing up for the New York Book Fair Ahhh...without remembering fairs past - the leaky Armory of old, the cramped Americana Hotel, the fresh start with promoter Sandy he made the trains run on time Smith. All those early bookfair expeditions to the Big Apple for the  Trinity, Greenwich Village, and Park Avenue events, staying with pals in Jersey City and Brooklyn, and Puffys or the Raccoon Lodge, or Walkers in Tribeca. We were young then, and didnt need to sleep. And Read More
  • Hegemony

    Sun, 31 Mar 2013 07:07:32 Permalink
    (Just as a courtesy I want to inform you at the outset that this is not in any way an April Fool blog, though it is April and I have done my fair share of foolish things.)When I published Gone Boy, my first book, in 1999 my publishers Kodansha and  Random House did what companies did back then to publicize a book; they took out ads in print media, arranged a long string of radio and television interviews, and sent me on book tours to the Pacific Northwest, LA, the greater Atlanta area, and, of course, the Northeast. I Read More
  • The Man Who "Really" Invented POD

    Sun, 24 Mar 2013 04:18:28 Permalink
    The Joshua Ward HouseBob Murphy grew up behind a cash register in a family owned drugstore. He exhibited an enlarged collecting gland at an early age, and wheedled his parents into driving him around to the many antique shops that existed in those days in search of antique coins, guns and colonial artifacts, as I recall. Then books as historical references, then books as collectible things in themselves.He set up his first shop in the reference room at the Boston Public Library. In the morning hed go hunting in Bostons many old and used book stores, making copious notes Read More
  • Objects of Desire

    Mon, 18 Mar 2013 10:43:09 Permalink
    The good news is that Ive made a few hefty sales in recent weeks. The bad news is that nobody is in any hurry to pay me. So I left home Friday morning for Ephemera Thirty Three - the Ephemera Societys international conference and show held at the commodious and very pleasant Hyatt Regency Hotelin Greenwich, Connecticut - with about $50,000 in receivables and $30,000 in ummm, obligations rattling along after me like tin cans on a newlyweds car.The situation was not conducive to aggressive buying. Indeed, I entered the show determined to sit on my hands (Auction room Read More
  • Report from Murderer's Row

    Sun, 10 Mar 2013 11:17:21 Permalink
    The cold weather followed John Thomson, Lin Respess and me south from last week's Rosslyn book fair. Blinding flurries in Virginia, night time temperatures in the 20s in Alabama, and worrisome showers in the panhandle. Transitioning, finally, to sunny skies in Bradenton, Florida, just in time for the Pirates Tampa Bay spring training ballgame on Thursday. By Friday we were thawed out and ready to go back to work.Maybe its because so many people have been doing this show for so long, or maybe the fine weather combs everybodys nerve hairs back, but setup at the Florida Antiquarian Book Fair Read More
  • Miserable Pirates

    Sat, 02 Mar 2013 06:34:46 Permalink
    A chilly wind in Washington DC this week. I got frostbitten ears walking across the Key bridge from Georgetownto the Washington Antiquarian Book Fair in Rosslyn, VA.Pity those rowers in their sculls on the Potomacfar below.As usual promoter Beth Campbelland her staff got us moved in to the second floor of the Holiday Inn smoothly and efficiently. It helps that most of the dealers here have been doing the show for years, but still. Beth is definitely a hands on organizer, scooting between the three rooms of the fair with tablecloths, invoices and sympathy.Beth says this event has a mailing Read More
  • "Finest Kind!" - A Modest Proposal

    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 10:46:58 Permalink
    Fish Hatchery Ten Pound Island. John Hoagland, circa 1930. In a far sighted effort to maintain fish stocks, this hatchery provided lobster and cod fry from eggs. Operated by the US Fish Commission, it ran from 1889 to 1954. Hoagland was an American painter active in the 1930s. Framed, $300Its an expression that came fresh off the docks. When a fisherman wanted to invoke the utmost superlative, hed say, finest kind. Eventually usage morphed to more mundane levels. How ya dooin?Finest kind!But these days life along the waterfront is anything but the finest kind.In an effort to conserve a Read More
  • Weird S**t

    Sun, 17 Feb 2013 09:31:38 Permalink
    Weve been doing this for nearly thirty years, and its still a thrill to step off the airplane into sunny skies and balmy air (when we're on the ground, I mean). This year, in particular, exchanging snow drifts for temperatures in the 70s has been a blessing. Anne Marie found us a cheap room at the wonderfully named Vertigo Hotel so, when we werent taking care of book business, we got to spend quality time in a Hitchock movie. Wednesday afternoon, on our way to visit friends in Oakland, muscle memory propelled me to the parking lot of Serendipity. Except for Read More
  • The Power of Publicity

    Sun, 10 Feb 2013 07:49:28 Permalink
    All night during the blizzard of 2013, beneath the winds steady roar, I kept hearing a thumping noise from the back of our house. It sounded as if a door had come loose and was blowing open and shut. But of course, that was impossible. There was already a foot of snow on the ground enough to inhibit swinging doors. What, then?The noise had stopped when I went out to shovel next morning. In fact, I became so absorbed in excavating my car that I almost forgot about it. Only as an afterthought, on my way back inside to sit Read More
  • 7000 Teddy Bears

    Sun, 03 Feb 2013 03:20:28 Permalink
    Yeah, I know its a little off topic. Just consider this a message from our sponsor. Last week I read in the venerable Newtown Bee that more than 7000 teddy bears had been sent to Newtown, Connecticut, site of Decembers horrific school shootings.I thought that was a sweet gesture.Then I got to thinking of those caring individuals who wished so strongly to comfort the grieving Newtown parents. It must have taken quite a bit of energy and planning to go out and buy a toy, and wrap it, and figure out where to send it, and schlep it down to Read More
  • Breadfruit Noir

    Sun, 27 Jan 2013 11:57:17 Permalink
    The incomparable Peter Howardonce said something to the effect that Books are mysteries for booksellers to solve. If thats the case, my professional life has been one long Raymond Chandler novel.Last week, as I was making my way down the mean streets of the Eastern Macro Metro Corridor, a kindly lady placed a book in my hands.What do you think of this? she asked.I think I should buy it, I replied.It was a 47 page quarto, bound in later brown leprosy morocco, and a second 41 page quarto volume, bound with yet a third, 13 page work, with its own Read More
  • YARRR!

    Sun, 20 Jan 2013 12:54:58 Permalink
    Spent the last week cataloging and packing books to take to Washington so that my colleague John Thomson of Bartlebys Books can drive them out to San Francisco for the big international antiquarian book show there in mid-February. John and his wife Karen are specialists in Americana, and they take great delight in traveling the byways of this vast land. (John is also president of the ABAA, and Ill bet he especially relishes byways sufficiently by the way as to put him out of cell phone and computer contact with the ABAA and its tiresome concerns.) In any event, as Read More
  • The Amazing Donaldson Dumpster Archive

    Sun, 13 Jan 2013 09:28:44 Permalink
    A colleague sent me a box of papers the other day. He said they contained documents having to do with a ship named the Olive Branch. But it was clear to me at first glance that for the past few decades, at least, theyd had more to do with the dumpster. That was certainly where theyd come from, and probably where they were bound.But after I removed the material that was literally falling apart, I began to see some continuity. Most of the paper had to do with a man named Joseph Donaldson, apparently a ship captain and a diplomat Read More
  • It's Only a Paper Moon...

    Mon, 07 Jan 2013 10:37:58 Permalink
    Not the XL CenterThis is my fourth report on Papermania, the giant ephemera show held annually in Hartford, Connecticut on the first weekend after New Years day.My last three reviews have been scathing. The city of Hartford is falling apart; the Papermania venue formerly the Hartford Civic Center, now the XL Center, is a hideous combination of concrete floors, deathray lighting, and a pathetically bad naming idea. Yes, XL may be the sponsoring insurance company, but it only reminds me of overweight people in tee shirts lined up at Cracker Barrel for the high fructose corn syrup special. The Read More
  • A New Year's Recollection

    Mon, 31 Dec 2012 11:14:56 Permalink
    For reasons I no longer recall, I stopped getting the Sunday New York Times years ago. Reading it these days is a rich and slightly over-the-top experience, sort of like taking a steamy bubble bath.My wife and I are spending the New Years holiday with friends up in Camden, Maine a couple weve known since we were hippies together back in the 70s. Theyve done quite well for themselves since then, and our visits with them now have that same bubble bath feeling, brought on by an abundance of food, drink, laughter, and fondly shared memories. Also a lot Read More
  • All I Want for Xmas is a Droid With Apps

    Sun, 23 Dec 2012 08:03:56 Permalink
    Here, for the third year, is my annual Christmas blog. Id like to say this weeks entry is back by popular demand, but there has been no demand for it. Bookmans Log, Im happy to say, has never been burdened with demands. The truth is, Im taking the day off in honor of the season. Im going read the Sunday paper, then putter around my office, then turn my compost pile, then watch the football game, then walk to dinner and eat and drink and talk and laugh with the inlaws, the wife, the kids, their kids, and our several Read More
  • Tale of Two Book Stores

    Mon, 17 Dec 2012 09:11:22 Permalink
    Santa checks her device. She wants to find out who's been naughty, and who's been niceJust finished reading an inspiring article in Atlantic Magazineabout the opening of a new book store.Two years ago, after Nashville lost its last downtown indie, and both big box book outlets closed, bestselling author and local resident Ann Patchett opened a store of her own.The real story is more complicated and interesting than that, and Ms. Patchett tells it charmingly in her article. The bottom line is that Nashville again has an excellent indie book operation. And Patchett, thanks to her many connections, Read More
  • Two New Book Stores

    Mon, 17 Dec 2012 06:55:50 Permalink
    Santa checks her device - to find out who's been naughty, and who's been niceJust finished reading an inspiring article in Atlantic Magazineabout the opening of a new book store.Two years ago, after Nashville lost its last downtown indie, and both big box book outlets closed, bestselling author and local resident Ann Patchett opened a store of her own.The real story is more complicated and interesting than that, and Ms. Patchett tells it charmingly in her article. The bottom line is that Nashville again has an excellent indie book operation. And Patchett, thanks to her many connections, is Read More
  • Guiding Lights

    Sun, 09 Dec 2012 10:22:10 Permalink
    Ive ranted before about lighthouses being one of those subject areas from which collectors have mysteriously vanished. People scrabbling and clawing in the most fearsome way for lighthouse literature and then one day, more or less out of the blue, they dont want any at all. Not even the rarest material. I suspect that in this case, eBay and print-on-demand technology killed the market. The field was largely information driven, and once people got access to cheap reprints or bargain copies of scarce texts, the game was over for dealers like me. This is not to say that the public Read More
  • Captain Winsor and "The Passengers"

    Sun, 02 Dec 2012 07:58:48 Permalink
    Its been a month since my website was hacked and poisoned with malware. Since then, the tech guys have been working valiantly to du-bug the site, fix broken code, and move tenpound.com to a new host. Somehow, all this activity disabled my email and, for an exciting couple of days, I was dead in the water.    Now, I am happy to report, my email capability has been restored, and the website is clean and healthy. You can go to http://tenpound.com/ without fear.    The bill for all this has yet to arrive, and the cost of having a toxic website Read More
  • Therapy Dog

    Sun, 25 Nov 2012 09:20:11 Permalink
    Pryor, James Chambers. NAVAL HYGIENE.  Phila.  (1918).  Color and b/w plates. vii, 507 pp. Bound in brown cloth with gold spine lettering. Light cover wear, else very good condition. $175 This is the kind of book that brings me joy. It is a serious, comprehensive work dealing with hygiene and preventive care in the WWI-era U.S. Navy. It covers nutrition, diseases, hazards of the sea, health aboard submarines, and so forth. Pursuing this agenda, text and illustrations provide a marvelous view of everyday shipboard life, with a documentary earnestness reminiscent of Lewis Hine. The book is also an artifact of a culture Read More
  • Practice Makes (Nearly) Perfect

    Mon, 19 Nov 2012 10:25:19 Permalink
    Sometimes the years seem to fly by like calendar leaves flapping off the wall in a corny movie. That was much the feeling at this years 36th Annual Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair, held at the Hynes Convention Center.  Old veterans of Bostons past walked the familiar aisles, nodding at one another Here we are again. Members of the excellent Brede staff, many of whom have been working with us for years, gave us a Good to see you again shoulder clap. And they meant it. Wed each survived another year and were back in the familiar, comfortable confines Read More
  • A Gazelle Speaks

    Sun, 11 Nov 2012 03:49:10 Permalink
    So, to pick up where last weeks rather grim entry left offOn Monday  October 29th I went on my Ten Pound Island website to check a catalog listing. What I found, instead of a catalog page, was a scary looking red sign warning that my site was a Reported Attack Page! My website had been blocked by Google for suspicious activity.It took me a few days to locate a company that could sort the problem out, and it has taken them two weeks, so far, to get it sorted. They tell me my website should be cleaned up and back Read More
  • Of Webb and the Web

    Sat, 03 Nov 2012 05:04:33 Permalink
    William Henry Webb was one of those American geniuses who come along every generation. Men of his type are not noted for their poetry or invention, but for their ability to assemble and organize all the disparate parts of what is known and, from this synthesis, to establish new standards of efficiency and scale.The great industrialists of the 19th and early 20th centuries proceeded in this manner. Rather than devise new technologies men like Henry Ford systematized and perfected existing practices. The railroad barons and oil kings didnt invent locomotives or petroleum products their contribution, whether for good or Read More
  • Einstein's "God Letter"

    Mon, 29 Oct 2012 09:43:13 Permalink
     I first met John Schulman at a bookfair on Cape Cod in the 1980s. He called himself John Ezra Schulman back then. Sported an Ezra Pound-like goatee, sold poetry, and went about his business with a poets joy. I remember thinking, He wont last long in this business. Twenty-five years later, Id have to say I was wrong about that. His Caliban Book Shop in Pittsburgh, with its stock of 45,000 books and a warehouse bursting with another 150,000, is one of the countrys best.  John himself is a leader in our trade, serving as resident appraiser at the annual Read More
  • Not Book People

    Mon, 22 Oct 2012 08:14:13 Permalink
    Shriner's auditorium, main hallWhats up with moving forward? Five years ago everyone said in the future, or in days to come, or even good old later on. Now the default phrase is moving forward a clumsy trope that riddles our daily speech. Its the kind of virus for which there is no cure but time. I suppose Ill just have to ignore it moving forward. Now, where was I?Marvin Getman, promoter of Boston area antique shows, has developed a reputation for energetic, organized, and well advertised events. His shows in Concord, Wellesley, Lexington, Wilmington, and Boston are said to Read More
  • The Best Letter Ever

    Mon, 15 Oct 2012 10:07:23 Permalink
    Seattle, 2012 Bob Dylan and I have been touring for decades, and occasionally our paths cross. But I didnt see him at the Key Arena Saturday night, and he didnt see me at this weekends Seattle Antiquarian Book Fair. As usual, the event was flawlessly organized by local bookselling legend Louis Collins and, although the number of exhibitors was down a bit owing to conflicts with the Torontoand MARIABbook fairs, attendance was excellent. (Louis can really turn em out.) Thursday afternoon I did some scouting downtown, primarily at Brooklyn Seafood, but also at a place where I was able to purchase Read More
  • The Best Letter Ever

    Mon, 15 Oct 2012 09:49:08 Permalink
    Seattle, 2012 Bob Dylan and I have been touring for decades, and occasionally our paths cross. But I didnt see him at the Key Arena Saturday night, and he didnt see me at this weekends Seattle Antiquarian Book Fair. As usual, the event was flawlessly organized by local bookselling legend Louis Collins and, although the number of exhibitors was down a bit owing to conflicts with the Torontoand MARIABbook fairs, attendance was excellent. (Louis can really turn em out.) Thursday afternoon I did some scouting downtown, primarily at Brooklyn Seafood, but also at a place where I was able to purchase Read More
  • The Female Marine and her Sisters

    Sun, 07 Oct 2012 10:27:37 Permalink
    The cover girl for my latest rare book catalog is a lady named Elizabeth Emmons. The fates were not kind to Elizabeth. After her mother died, her father became a drunkard and also died. She lost an eye in a carriage accident, and shortly thereafter her fiance died. Heartbroken and alone, she took to the sea, where she found true love but then was shot and killed by a drunken Spanish madman. All this is related by the otherwise anonymous S.L. who describes the murder in a letter from Key West. The story was published in Boston in 1841 as Read More
  • Used Books of the Future II

    Sun, 30 Sep 2012 10:47:40 Permalink
    Up in Cape Breton all week mowing my lawn (with a chainsaw) and working on my walking book  I did not, I swear, buy, sell, or catalog an antiquarian book for the duration of my stay. So this weeks blog will be about old books in a once-removed sort of way. (See my blog entry of November 27, 2011 for Used Books of the Future I )When I wasnt writing or chainsawing, I was reading a wonderful used book called In the Hand of Dante , a novel by Nick Tosches published by Little, Brown in 2002. Nick, a devotee Read More
< prev
  • Showing 271-300 (of 318 total)
  • Page 10 of 11
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
next >

Looks like you are ready to submit this application

If you are satisfied that your application is complete, go ahead and click "submit this application."
Otherwise, click "review this application" to review your answers or make additional changes.