Category: Feature

Articles specially written or curated for the IOBA Standard

Book Selling at Antique Malls

with Lee Kirk, Gayle Williamson, and Sharon Eisenberg So as part of this month’s theme of alternate selling venues for online book sellers, I thought it would be interesting to do a piece on selling in antique malls. Over the years…

2013 IOBA Scholarship Announcement

The IOBA Scholarship Committee reviewed a number of worthy applications this year, and we have two very deserving winners.  Before getting to that, though, just a few words about the scholarships. As those who have been keeping up with announcements…

Book Selling at Genre Conventions

“Fandom” is a term that certain science fiction fans use to describe themselves, and conventions are where fandom congregates to indulge their mutual interest in the genre and meet some of the authors and artists (the “pros”) who make it…

“Don’t Do It!”

Editor’s note: My first encounter with this article was actually at its debut, as a talk delivered by Greg to the Class of 2009 (of which I was a member) at the Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar. I thought it was…

A Small Association

This is the story of a minor bibliographic mystery, and how it was solved. It’s just a small story — no big reveal to be picked up by the wire services, no five-hundred-year-old royalty buried under the car park —…

The Story of IOBA’s New Logo

A logo is, in many ways, like a person’s face. It is a graphic representation of an organization, easily recognized and often generating an emotional reaction in the viewer. Ideally, the logo will bring to mind the character and personality of the organization it represents. With IOBA well into its second decade, it seemed a good time to take a look at our logo and make sure it truly represented who we were and how we wanted to be perceived.

Rostenberg & Stern: An Appreciation

If, like me, you haven’t been born into a family that boasts generations of booksellers, if bookselling isn’t in your blood, you can always learn from the past. Reading the memoirs of those booksellers who came before us can be as edifying as it is entertaining. There are many to booksellers from which to choose, but two in particular can inspire and educate: Leona Rostenberg and Madeleine B. Stern.